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Satellina

Moon Kid

Satellina is Moon Kids first game in the app world. It is a crazy multi-random-sequence puzzle world of kaleidoscopic colours and distracting patterns.

It is available on iOS and Android from the 29th January, and is reasonably priced at just  $1.99 or equivalent in local currency.

Satellina has around 50 hypnotic levels that seem at first to be repetitive yet although each begins the same there are so many pieces moving or that can be moved on the screen that what seemed familiar is suddenly a new experience. 
Onscreen, Green, Yellow and Red particles spiral and swirl in an effervescent display all over and around the screen to a synthpop soundtrack. The basic object of this totally abstract yet compellingly addictive game is to remove all the particles from the screen by swiping them with your finger. This may sound easy and have the feeling of no-challenge simplicity but it is most definitely not so as there are many random cycling puzzles that you have to decipher first such as, and for example; when you have to hit the green pieces first to turn all of the yellow ones into green and the red into yellow. You often have to continually repeat the process until the screen is clear but if you hit the wrong colour or shape it is a fatal error which causes the end of play - game over - and you have to start again.

As long as you approach Satellina in the correct, abstract frame of mind, you can always (or nearly always) find something new to do if you feel you are stuck or going nowhere in your current predicament.

        

Included with the game is an alternative palette for colour-blindness, which is a nice touch.

Satellina Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/satellina

About Moon Kid

Moon Kid is the game studio of Peter Malamud Smith, a game designer, writer, and musician living in New York. Peter co-created the 8-bit adaptation of The Great Gatsby,
writes occasionally for the AV Club and others, and plays guitar and cries and sings, la la la la, in a band called The Aye-Ayes.

review by Grant

 

 

© Chris Baylis 2011-2015