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Empire of the Dead.

WestWind Games.

Empire of the Dead is a 28mm skirmish game, set in the late Victorian era, 1888 to be precise. Following the discovery of Infernium, a powerful mineral source of energy, which is used to power the Steampunk inventions, supernaturals such as Vampires and Werewolves have stepped out of the shadows, keen to secure this valuable resource for themselves, held at bay only by the Church, the Police, and the various Gentlemans Clubs. Of course with Human greed being what it is, these factions have no issue with fighting each other as well as the otherworldly creatures.

EotD, uses a heavily modified version of Games Workshops, out of print, Mordheim ruleset, for me this is great as i am an avid Mordheim and skirmish gamer. The most notable changes at first glance are the use of D10's over D6's, and the disappearance of XP as you play. The latter also taking away some of the paper work at the end of a game.

Empire has several factions, and they are all covered well in the beautifully illustrated, hardbound, rulebook.


The miniatures are fantastically sculpted, nice to paint, and easy to assemble. My only complaint, and it extends to so many miniatures games these days, is the lack of poseability when assembling models. I really do like my warband/crew/gang etc. to look different to the next guy with the same faction, but that being said, if it my only complaint of a game, then it isnt a real hardship #firstworldproblems.

The game itself plays out in an I go, you go format, with each player activating all his available models, before play passes to his opponent. Close Combat is handled differently to Mordheim, in that each player rolls off with an amount of dice equal to his combat value (including bonuses from weapons etc) and then picks his highest, the winner is the person with the higher roll, causing a wound to his opponent.

It lends itself nicely to campaign play, with multiple scenarios offered in the rule book, and the ability to create your own being relatively easy. Overall, as a lover of skirmish games, EotD will find its way back to my table time and time again.

The miniatures are fantastically sculpted, nice to paint, and easy to assemble. My only complaint, and it extends to so many miniatures games these days, is the lack of poseability when assembling models. I really do like my warband/crew/gang etc. to look different to the next guy with the same faction, but that being said, if it my only complaint of a game, then it isnt a real hardship #firstworldproblems.

The game itself plays out in an I go, you go format, with each player activating all his available models, before play passes to his opponent. Close Combat is handled differently to Mordheim, in that each player rolls off with an amount of dice equal to his combat value (including bonuses from weapons etc) and then picks his highest, the winner is the person with the higher roll, causing a wound to his opponent.

It lends itself nicely to campaign play, with multiple scenarios offered in the rule book, and the ability to create your own being relatively easy. Overall, as a lover of skirmish games, EotD will find its way back to my table time and time again.

-Grant

 

 

 

 

© Chris Baylis 2011-2015