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DEADFALL is a Steam game full of Adventure and Survival. It can also be multiplayer, though as yet I
haven't had the opportunity to test it as such.

The game begins with American Agent Jennifer Goodwin on her way to discover the location of The
Heart of Atlantis - an Ancient Artifact - thought to be hidden somewhere in the ruins of an Egyptian Temple.
A Jewel known as the Tears of Isis Jewel is used to explode the Sanctuary Gate so that the adventure proper can
begin.

On her way there she meets up with the ruggedly handsome, Indiana-Jones-a-like, James Lee Quartermain, the
great Grandson of the famous Allan Quartermain. From here on you take control of James Lee, with Jennifer
tagging along behind, occasionally helping when necessary, you cannot determine whether she will help or not,
and often making detrimental comments loud enough for JLQ to hear. Although looking quite similar to the most
well known of female adventurers, Jennifer is certainly no Lara Croft.

              

There are the usual 3 opportunities for setting the basic games Difficulty - Easy, Normal and Hard, plus there are also
3 opportunities to set the combat difficulty, again Easy, Normal or Hard. I chose (rather bravely I must say considering
how not good I am at puzzle games) Normal, and managed to continue through with only several deaths and returns to
the last Saved Slot. The game has an excellent auto-save function which, in the Normal mode (I cannot say about the
other Difficulty modes) is regular enough that you never go too long into the game without it saving. I really detest it
when games let you get almost to the end of a chapter and  then you die and have to start the whole thing again from the
beginning just because the auto-save only works at the very end of a chapter.

              

Also after the Ancient Artifacts and other similar Treasures are aforce of Indiana Jones style Germans, in fact there are a
number of similarities between this game and the Indiana Jones movie stories. But that doesn't matter because this is a fun
game with lots to do, many interesting puzzles, and some adrenaline buzzing action.

              

You are helped throughout the quest by Allan Quartermain's journal which has some easy and some cryptic picto-grams of
the current puzzle you face - the book, when you select to open it, gives you no options on pages, it simply opens up at the
necessary page.

Within the hidden temple are many Undead humanoids. These are virtually immune to your weapons until you turn on your
torch and press the button to make it as bright as it will go. This light causes the Undead creatures to burn (see above screen)
and thus be susceptible to bullets etc. Now you can destroy them before they destroy you.

I took the above screenshots off the internet using Google Images. I did take my own screenies but I somehow lost them.
If there is any problem with me using these shots then please accept my apologies and I will remove them as necessary.

Apart from dying in the game, which I expect anyway, there was one aggravating problem on my installed version. I say this
in case it is only my copy that has this fault, and that is the noise. I found that the background noises drowned out the speech
of characters even after I had turned the Vocal Volume right up and the Music and Effects way down. However I did find that
by using my THRUSTMASTER headphones nearly all the extraneous noise was cut out.

A fine adventure, strong storyline, good graphics and animations and a solid vocal cast it is an action-driven first-person shooter,
with addictive elements from other action-adventure games, films and books, the least of which are King Solomon's Mines and
the Indiana Jones series. Become an adventurer, hunt for treasures, explore unknown regions of the world and rescue the damsel
when she gets herself into distress from the evil clutches of mainly Undead villains.

It sells online for about £32.99 or there is a Digital Deluxe version for £39.99

The Digital Deluxe Edition includes:

Key Features

System Requirements

 

© Chris Baylis 2011-2015