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RENOWN for their amazing range of fantastic ZOMBIE games, CRAP & SLAP is a jump to the left without the step to the right for Twilight Creations. This is a fun game for 2 -10 players aged fourteen years and older designed by Twilight Creations CEO Kerry Breitenstein.

It is a simple question & answer card game with the fun element coming from the answers (in part one) and the questions (in part two) chosen by the players. If you have played any of the Apples to Apples style of game (Apples to Apples being the industry standard by which this style of game is usually compared).

CRAP or SLAP cards are in two halves - the top half shows a Situation and the bottom half shows a Reaction. To be the winner of Crap or Slap you have to be the first player to obtain a preset number of cards. 

Playing the first half. Each player is dealt a hand of cards (5) and one player chosen to start. This player selects a card from their hand and reads out aloud the SITUATION (the top half) of the card. The other players then study the  REACTION sections of the cards in their hands and choose one which they think is best suited to the current Situation. They place their chosen cards face down in front of themselves until all players have made their selection. These cards are NOT turned over at this point. The player who chose and read aloud the Situation now collects all the face down cards without looking at them and shuffles them thoroughly. Once they are shuffled the player looks through them and reads all the Reactions, selecting one that they feel best suits the Situation in the way they see it - remember there is no right or wrong, correct or incorrect Reaction to the Situation, it is personal choice by the player who plays the Situation card. The owner of the card chosen by the player at turn wins the Situation card and keeps it in front of themselves face down. Once one player has won 50% of the necessary preset target (ie 4 cards out of 8 in a 3-5 player came) then the first half of the game ends and the second half begins.

The second half:
Playing the first half. Each player is dealt a hand of cards (5) and one player chosen to start. This player selects a card from their hand and reads out aloud the REACTION (the bottom half) of the card. The other players then study the SITUATION sections of the cards in their hands and choose one which they think is best suited to the current Reaction. They place their chosen cards face down in front of themselves until all players have made their selection. These cards are NOT turned over at this point. The player who chose and read aloud the Reaction now collects all the face down cards without looking at them and shuffles them thoroughly. Once they are shuffled the player looks through them and reads all the Situations, selecting one that they feel best suits the Reaction in the way they see it - remember there is no right or wrong, correct or incorrect Situations to the Reaction, it is personal choice by the player who plays the Reaction card. The owner of the card chosen by the player at turn wins the Reaction card and keeps it in front of themselves face down. The player who first gains the preset number of cards required wins the game.

Another thing to remember is that the Reaction on the Bottom of the card is NOT the correct answer to the Situation on the top section of the same card. There are 250 fun situations and 250 fun reactions so the emphasis is on FUN!

For an example of the first half, here's a Situation chosen at random from the deck of 250 cards:    "You find a thong in your 16-year-old's laundry" ?  Before selecting an answer ask yourself the question "What would I do?"

Here are 4 Reactions also chosen randomly from the deck:
Player 1. Hit the delete button.
Player 2. Cut them in half.
Player 3. Explain to them that you are not the person they are looking for.
Player 4. Bake cookies.
Which of those Reactions would you choose if you were the player at turn and the Situation was read aloud by you.

For an example of the second half, here's a Reaction chosen at random from the deck of 250 cards:  "Scream bloody murder."  Before selecting an answer ask yourself the question "This is how I would react to...." and then choose the nearest situation from those available that would make you react in the selected manner.

Here are 4 Situations also chosen randomly from the deck:
Player 1. You see someone buying junk food with food stamps.
Player 2. A drunk cousin gets out of hand at your wedding.
Player 3. You make a sarcastic comment and someone thinks you are being serious.
Player 4. A clown comes to your back door.
Which of those Reactions would you choose if you were the player at turn and the Situation was read aloud by you.

Please note that in my examples I have just taken a handful of cards from the 250 available at random and written down the Reactions and Situation as needs be for the examples. When playing the game you get to choose from the cards in your hand, you don't have to randomly select one. The same goes when you are making the decision for the winning card, you use your personal opinion. Does the question & answer combination make you laugh ? appeal to you in some way ? remind you of someone or something ? If it is your turn you are in control. Remember to shuffle the cards as you collect them and never look at them until you have mixed them thoroughly - no playing King Maker, it's not allowed.

The box is a deep blue surround with a bright yellow-orange explosive flash in the frame forcing the game's name to the fore almost in 3D. It stands out perfectly well on a crowded games store, so 10/10 for the packaging colour scheme. I tried to come up with what I would perceive to be a better boz design but cannot think of anything that would be as impulsive to the casual browser's eye. CRAP or SLAP is a good adult (or almost adult) game for a large group - it is always better with 6 or more players - who want to have a bit of fun without having to think too much. It is more a game for drinkers than thinkers. Definitely one for the middle shelf.

 

© Chris Baylis 2011-2015