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Conquer as much land as you can! 
 
In this award-winning game, you need to draw and place tiles of French landscape to build your own territory. 
 
Create cities, take roads, and strategically place your meeples to defy your friends and players from around the world!

ANDROID played on Samsung S8

Despite being used to playing CARCASSONNE on a table with fair-sized tiles and wooden meeples I was surprised at how clear it was and how fluently it played on my Smart Phone.

It begins with a single tile positioned in the middle of the screen, one tile floating near this central space and 70 tiles in the draw stack. Each player draws a tile in their turn and plays it onto the board next to a previously placed tile (any previously placed tile not just one that the player has placed themselves) as long as it fits the terrain requirements - no mismatches allowed. The game shows you blank squares where you can place the tile and once you have selected where you wish to put it you can position it by turning it round.

Most times when you place a tile you are given the option to also place a Meeple in your colour, though you may only place it on Monasteries (which score when completely surrounded), Roads (which score when both ends of the road are ended) or Plains/Wasteland (which score per tile at the end of the game). Unlike the original Carcassonne board game there is no scoring for Meadows, but as you do not get the choice to place a Meeple in a Meadow this isn't a problem.

Whenever you place a tile you have to click the tick to accept. If you are then given the opportunity to place a Meeple, sometime you may have a selection of places where it can be put and then you have to choose one (one only, even if you have more Meeples available to you) of them. However you must remember to touch the Meeple so that it stops hovering and then click the tick to accept its position, clicking the tick while the Meeple is still hovering stops the placing and ends your turn.

Play is fast and the "easy" AI is smarter than average, it rarely makes any sort of mistake in placing, often preferring to put a tile in a "safe" position rather than play it where it might be of use to you later.

As a game for your phone it is extremely good but be prepared to lose between 8%-10% of battery per solo game. I haven't played it online yet but I would imagine the battery usage would be higher as human players take longer to have their turn than the A.I.

PC Steam

  

To be perfectly honest (and I'm nothing if not perfect ... okay well maybe it's honest I am) apart from the larger screen and the fact that I could manipulate the tiles with a mouse rather than my finger, I haven't found any difference between playing CARCASSONNE on the PC to playing it on my phone. Obviously I cannot carry my PC around in my pocket so that's another difference if you want to be picky, but gamewise it is exactly the same. You can play solo or multi-player, you get to lay one randomly drawn tile per turn and you get shown where that tile can be laid - sometimes there is only one possible place. Like the boardgame if you create an empty space surrounded by tiles you may not place a tile in that space even if you have one that fits.

  

Also like the Android version you cannot place Meeples in the Meadows - maybe my memory is wrong or maybe the Meadow Meeples came into the game during an expansion, my memory is a bit fluffy, but I would imagine that seeing as the digital versions appear to have followed the Carcassonne rules to the letter then it is me that is remembering the game incorrectly - it has been a while since I have played the original version and that's the only excuse I can muster.

  

In both digital versions you begin with no cards in your hand, and never get to hold any, and six Meeples. Once all of your Meeples are on the board you can only get them back by completing the scoring area or road you have placed them in. It is imperative to get your Meeples into play but there is a delicate balance between grabbing the odd few points for placing them and picking them up again in the same turn, which you can do if you complete a road or plains (or, at certain times, any area to be fair), and positioning them on the board so that they score large amounts on the final tally - large areas of City buildings bringing in the majority of points.

As a fan of CARCASSONNE, even though I admit to not having played it (the boardgame) in a while, I was a little dubious about how it would play digitally and I have to say that any doubts I had were ill-foundede; it plays very well and is bright, colourful and enjoyable. I will eventually get around to playing it online and indeed I did try a few times but for one reason or another both the Android Phone and the PC had difficulty getting online to a game server. I am sure it was something to do with my system at home which is probably affected by the severe cold we are currently suffering.

  

I would happily suggest that other fans of this boardgame get themselves a digital copy, probably for the phone rather than the PC because it is a great game to carry around with you, especially if yuou have a long car or train journey - I didn't mention plane journeys because there is usually either a good film to watch onboard or the Captain keeps telling you to switch off electricals incase you crash the plane and we certainly don't  want that to happen no matter how good CARCASSONNE digital is.

  

 

© Chris Baylis 2011-2015