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A TIME OF STEEL AND PHILANTHROPY

Pegasus Spiele publishes strategic game Carnegie

With Carnegie, Pegasus Spiele has published a new strategic action management game designed by Xavier Georges and illustrated by Ian O’Toole.

Travel back to the 19th century, an era of rapidly accelerating scientific discovery and invention and growth. Opportunities and success await as the steel industry pushes the country to new heights. Inspired by the life of Andrew Carnegie, a philanthropist and major player in the steel industry, players will be challenged to grow their companies through shrewd investments in real estate, industry, and transportation. True success will come not just from wealth but also from generosity in donations to key endeavors like education and human rights. Who will rise to the top and push the country to a new era of development?

To succeed in business, players will need to carefully manage their company by developing new departments and strategically using their employees. Each of the departments in the company corresponds to one of the game’s four types of actions: Human Resources, Management, Construction, and Research & Development. At the beginning of the game, each player will start with the same company board but be able to customize it as they play.

Each turn the active player will choose an action from the timeline track. The active player will go first but then other players will follow, so strategic thinking is important when selecting the actions! As players activate actions they’ll invest in real estate and create transportation chains, building up their wealth and influence and then donating to worthy causes. After 20 rounds the most successful company will win!

Featuring gameplay for up to four players, and a dedicated solo mode, Carnegie is a clever strategic game for one to four players aged 12 and up. One game takes around 90 to 120 minutes.

“Success is the power with which to acquire whatever one demands of life without violating the rights of others.” – Andrew Carnegie

 

© Chris Baylis 2011-2021